Category Archives: restaurants

Vendemmia 2017 Festa in Montefalco

Sunday was the last day for the Montefalco Wine Harvest festival. It’s a four day event to celebrate the harvest of the famed Sagrantino grapes among others. We had made reservations for lunch in L’Alchemista for lunch and invited new friends to join us. The weather was perfect. Very fall-like, a bit cool at lunch as we were seated next to a downward tiny street up which a strong, cool breeze was blowing. montefalco_street

Lunch at L’Alchemista was good, as always. They were packed so service was a bit slow. As we sat there crowds started gathering in the piazza and announcements were made from an upper balcony on the Comune building. And a group of costumed women sang folk songs. There was to be a parade of floats pulled by tractors. I love stuff like this. No pretensions.montefalco1

Down the main street we found the building where they were holding the wine tastings. This was our main reason for going. You pay 10 Euro per person and you get a glass and a little bag to wear around your neck to hold it. Then you can do unlimited tastings. There were a LOT of tables with a LOT of wine. One of our friends concentrated on the Sagrantino while I tried the Montefalco Rosso as well as the Sagrantino and a white made from Grechetto, Vigonier, and Chardonnay. All were very good. The Sagrantini were very dry to the point you felt all your saliva disappear.

wine1 wine2

Once we’d gotten our fill we headed back up the hill to the piazza where the parade was in full swing. They drive the tractors up another street into the piazza and park them around the edges. The floats, of course are wine oriented and lots of fun to see. Here are some pictures.

I love how this guy had put a yoke and harness on the front of his tractor, like it’s a horse…I guess it is, more or less.
parade1

And these folks are sitting on the float “a tavola” enjoying wine and a repast! parade2

Loved this giatantic wine bottle on one float.
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parade4
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It was one of the best Sagre I’ve ever been too. I’d go back!

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Storms over Umbertide

A couple of pictures of the major storms we woke up to on Saturday morning. The storms here generally come from the west. Our view is West/Northwest. These storms relentlessly moved from left to right and ever so slowly got closer and closer. Finally they got here but we were spared the brunt of the rain. Later in the day I noticed the Tiber river was swollen with rainwater and brown with mud. All came from up-stream where these massive storms must have dumped copious water!

Pigeons fighting the winds.
pigeons
storm_castle
storm

Fun restaurant posting

Today, for Luther’s birthday, we decided to try a recommended restaurant called L’Umbricello del Caccio. It is nominally in Magione which is between Lago del Trasimeno and Perugia. This restaurant is south of both of these towns up in some modest hills. Very pretty countryside with lots of olive groves and yellow fields of just-harvested wheat stubble.

We arrived in a small hamlet with an old church with a pretty clock. The bells rang every quarter hour. There is plenty of parking and the restaurant is on one side of the small road through the village while it’s dining terrace is on the other. This terrace sits right on the edge of the hill. Too bad the view is marred by three unsightly power lines. For this reason I didn’t take a photo.

The fun part of this post is that, like almost always when we walk into a restaurant, they spoke English to us and automatically gave us English menus. We have gotten used to this fact of life here. Somehow we are nailed as foreigners before we open our mouths. I’ve figured out they don’t know what sort of foreigner you are generally. German, English, Dutch usually. When we spoke in Italian to him he asked if we understood Italian. We said we did so he brought over Italian menus.

Here’s the fun part. This is a good example why I hate getting the English menu. They don’t really translate it fully or correctly. The first picture below is the English version of the Antipasto menu. The second picture is the Italian one. I count 10 choices on the English one and 16 on the Italian one. This illustrates how much tourists miss out on if they don’t at least understand “menu” Italian. What a difference! The subsequent pages were equally deficient.
antipasto_english

antipasto

They specialize in a dish called Caccio e Pepe. It is made by putting the hot pasta into the hollowed out rind of a parmigiano cheese. The cheese is scraped and stirred so it melts into the pasta. They also specialize in house-made Umbricelli. It is a very fat, dense, chewy spaghetti type of shape. Luther’s pasta was made in house and was what they call integrale or whole grain. Hence the slightly unappetizing color. Worm-colored…don’t think about it. He liked it! His second course was Cinghale or wild boar which they do wonderfully here. Sorry, my picture didn’t come out.

Here is the wheel of parmigiano in which they make the pasta.
caccio_pepe

Luther’s Umbricello.
luthers_pasta

I had caprese salad. The tomatoes should have been better, especially at this time of year. It tasted good. Then I got Umbricello too but mine was Carbonara with truffles. I had not had this is a long time as it is not normally on menus in Umbria. Carbonara was invented for the American soldiers after WWII in Rome because they had eggs!

My pasta.umbricelli_tartuffi
fork_umbricelli

We were sent on our way by a sweet angel. It was a nice outing…if very HOT!
angel

Zibu 2.0 Bistro

We have a new Bistro in town. It is a pop-up called Zibu 2.0 Bistro.
zibu_bistro2 There is a restaurant called Zibu 2.0 down the hill from us. They decided to try this pop up idea. The main restaurant has a beautiful space with vaulted stone ceilings. We have found the food spotty but continue to try it every so often. Then they had a wonderful little idea. Open an outdoor cafe with a limited menu in a pretty piazza. It is next to the town Opera House and Theater and La Rocca, our fortress. pretty_tables

It is a bit slap-dash in it’s furniture…mostly recycled things and mis-matched chairs. It also has sofas and places to sit and have a drink. Rather like an informal lounge.

We have gone a number of times. Once for a light dinner and the rest of the time for lunch. It is only a few steps from our door. The menu on the chalk board changes daily. zibu_bistro3

and they have a standing menu as well. menu
A few carefully chosen wines and beer on tap complete the menu. We do really enjoy it so I thought I’d give it some ink.

Today, Sunday, is a gorgous day. So clear with sunny skies and puffy clouds and a perfect temperature…a respite from the heat. We had a plate of fried squash blossoms which we shared.squash_blossom

Then Luther had pulled pork. A surprise! pulled_pork

And I had something called Suppli cacio e pepe. It was risotto with lots of Parmaghiano, shaped into cylinders and then they were breaded and fried. I decided to be adventurous an try it. It was GOOD!Suppli_cacio_e_pepe

 

 

Fun with friends…old and new

We have had visitors for in the past few weeks and I’ve documented some of our adventures in pictures below.

Our first visitors were new friends. They own a place down in the south of Italy in a small town called Pisticci. They came to Umbertide for a few nights staying in a nearby B&B. We had fun showing them around. Our first lunch at Erba Luna in Montone. We went to Erbe Luna to escape a gaggle of loud Americans. But damned if they didn’t end up with us anyway. Can’t win. But they gave us our most memorable moment when one of them asked if a dish came with a side of spaghetti…must have been Italian Americans…maybe from New Jersey (no offense New Jerseyans). Reminded us of the movie, Big Night.
Erba_luna

Ravioli with tartuffi, truffles…
ravioli_truffles

Pretty stairs down from the walls above to the outside dining terrace.
erba_luna_stairs

View from Montone toward the Apennines.
Montone_appinines

Sunday was a beautiful day to go to Calagrana for Pranzo. Asparagus, poached egg showered with truffles.
tartuffi_asparagi

Too pretty to eat Scampi with grilled polenta.
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Such perfect weather. Such a perfect view!
beauty_calagrana

We went to a couple of wineries for tastings and then to Montefalco to our favorite L’Alchemista. The Giro d’Italia was passing through town that day and they were all decorated in pink flags, bikes, and paraphernalia.

giro_d_italia

Ravioli and favas. Spring is the time for fresh favas.
l_alchemista_ravioli

We had a great time getting to know our new friends and plan to see them again soon.

The next weekend Luther and I decided to go to the Cantine Aperte, or open cellars. Many participating wineries. We chose one in Orvieto. It was a beautiful day but all the places we went to were very crowded.
Our picnic. It was a pretty day.
luther

Our next guests were very old friends…well not physically old! We’ve known each other since we all lived and worked in Germany 25 years ago.

We visited Montone for lunch and our great Wednesday market. The next day we went to Assisi. Our final day we visited Tabarinni, one of the best wineries in Umbria, lunched in Montefalco and went ceramic shopping in Deruta. Then, on the way to Rome we stopped in Orvieto mainly to see the magnificent Duomo. We had a light lunch of assorted bruschette and meat and cheese plates.

Lunch in Assisi. Another beautiful day.
Carlo_mary

The grilled octopus appetizer was amazing.
belissimo_octopus
As were the pastas.
pasta_Piaz_erba

pasta_favas

We enjoyed our time with our last guests. Talking of old times, eating, drinking and catching up.

Trip Report – Paris!

Our trip this time was to visit with friends who are living and working in Paris for three years. They live in a wonderful part of town in the 2nd arrondissement. Their time would be up at the end of the year. My sister, who is also friends with them, was meeting us there. So we had a fun trip combined with a great visit with my sister. Win, win.

We arrived at CDG airport in Paris on Saturday at 5PM. We managed to go through passport control and claim our luggage with no problem. We had directions from our friends to take the train then walk to meet them. The train was a non-stop from CDG to Gare du Nord but then it becomes a regular Metro train. Lucky for us we got off at the next station – Chatelet.

We texted our friends that we were walking and we negotiated the tiny, crowded cobblestone streets with no problem, ultimately meeting up with our friends at Redd Bar for a glass of wine. We dropped our suitcase in our rented VRBO flat, which was spacious if quirky.

Dinner was in Liza Paris, a Lebanese, small plates place. It was fun. Off to sleep after a long day.

Sunday was gray with heavy drizzle. We had breakfast with our friends in their apartment just a block from our flat. Croissants were wonderful as was the coffee. This day we planned to visit Musee Jacquemart Andre. He was a member of the upper middle class in the 1800s. They were just below the aristocracy or what we would now call the 1%. The museum featured his and his wife’s extensive art collection in their magnificent house on Blvd. Haussmann. They apparently spent more than the Louvre each year on their collection! They went to Italy at least once a year thus the collection leaned heavily towards Italian masters. Very interesting with the audio tour.

Beautiful staircase.
staircase

painting

We walked from there to the Seine and along the bank toward the Tuillierie Gardens. We admired the barges, many of them house barges, moored along the way. It was still very gray and began to rain when we stopped in a cafe in the park for lunch. We had buckwheat crepes called Galettes filled with ham, cheese, egg, and mushrooms (for me). After lunch we walked back to our neighborhood for a glass of wine and then adjourned for a nap.

Big ferris wheel.
paris_eye

Dinner was in a place called La Dame le Pic. It was a very upscale place with two tasting menus. I picked the one that included 2 appetizers, one entree and one dessert. The chef was adventurous with her ingredients and presentations. Everything was beautifully prepared. I had an oyster starter with green apples, fennel, and a green gelee, then a spring vegetable one with radishes, radish chips, artichoke. Then my entree was the John Dory fillet. And I chose the citrus dessert. All of the courses were very small and works of art.

When we left around 11:30 PM the entire city of Paris was in a celebratory mood with exuberant horn honking and congratulatory shouting. The election was over and Emmanuel Macron was the new French president beating Le Penn by a huge margin. This was good for moderates and those who want to preserve the European Union. Also for us who have a difficult time with Trump and Brexit. It was exciting to watch the celebration!

Monday, a holiday, Liberation Day, dawned gray again. We hoped to see the sun. This day we had tickets to visit the Vermeer exhibit at the Louvre. We met at the corner cafe for coffee and breakfast if anyone wanted some. The we took Nina, the dog, for a walk and Cathy headed back home while we continued our walk down to the Seine where we walked along the brand new river walk. They closed a tunnel that used to be used by cars. And opened it up. This was great because it was always a complaint that you couldn’t use the river as most cities did, for recreation etc. Now there are informal gardens, big trees, paths filled with bikers, walkers, runners, skateboarders all enjoying the river. There were cages filled with children. I couldn’t find the peanuts or I would have fed them 😉, actually they were cages enclosing the soccer playing area. They had this cool stuff that looked like concrete but was very spongy to walk on next to the play areas with climbing walls etc. to prevent injuries. Lovely improvements.

We stopped for a croque monsieur and a glass of wine. We headed to the Louvre to see the Vermeer show. It was very crowded even with advance tickets. Long lines everywhere. Finally, once we got in, it took forever to get near the paintings. But they were beautiful. The show was really good despite the crowds. Afterwards we visited the Maille mustard store. More mustards and condiments that you ever thought possible. Then we headed back.

This night we had dinner on a bateau called Le Calife. It is moored by the Ponte des Artes. It was a leisurely three hour dinner as we motored first upstream to Ponte Austerlitz, then downstream to Pont de Grenelle. Notable sights were: Notre Dame, the Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay, the Grand Palais, the Invalides, the Palais de Chaillot and the Eiffel Tower, the Statue of Liberty, and the remarkable bridges: Pont Neuf, Pont Marie, Pont Alexandre III, Pont au Double, Tournelle Bridge. My favorite part was the sparkley Eiffel Tower. It twinkles all up and down its height on the hour for five minutes. I had seen films of it but it was magical in person. The food was quite good and all prepared on board. I had the foie gras, the roasted lamb shoulder, cheese course and iced nougat for dessert. It was a one of a kind experience. Here are pictures taken from the boat.

Notre Dame just peeking up.
notre_dame

This is the model for the Statue of Liberty, a gift from the French.
lady_liberty_model

On the hour, the Eiffel tower twinkles all up and down it’s height. Magic.
twinkling_tour2

The ferris wheel at night with the French tri-colours in honor of the new president.
eye_night

This young man sat at a table next to us, all alone. He looked out the window with unseeing eyes. We wondered what his story was. One we thought of was that he’d proposed to his lover on Le Calife but before they were wed, she died in a tragic accident. He returned on the anniversary every year. Of course we have no idea.
pensive

Walking home.
walking_back

Tuesday dawned with the hoped for sun! One of our main objectives for this trip was to visit Giverny to see Claud Monet’s beautiful gardens so famous from his paintings. We had waited because seeing it in the rain would just not have been right. We took the train from Paris and in an hour arrived in the nearby town where we caught the bus to the little village of Giverny. There were crowds but they didn’t really affect the experience. The famed water lilies were not yet blooming but there were plenty of other flowers and bushes abloom. I took a TON of pictures but tried to pick a few that I liked best.

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bee

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garden3

garden2

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We also visited his house. The gasp producing moment was when we entered his studio. The walls were COVERED in paintings. Probably hundreds of millions of dollars worth. And there we were, nothing between us and these incredible works. Stupefying.

inside2

inside

I loved the kitchen.
kitchen

We had a nice lunch on a terrace of a little hotel in the village. There are actually people living there although it is overrun with tourists. We explored and then headed back to Paris.

lunch_nice_day

My sis looking smashing in her new hat!
cindy

We had dinner in Pirouette this evening. Randy was very upset that they didn’t have the tasting menu available for us. That was his main reason for picking the restaurant. We were sorry not to try it but went ahead and ordered from the menu. It was fun because of the company. The menu choices were very French…eel, sweetbreads etc.

Wednesday, we had a quick breakfast at the corner cafe and headed to the train station where we got the CDG train. Cindy’s flight and ours left only a half hour apart so we could all go together. Sad to say goodbye but it was great to have an adventure with my sister!

Trip Report – Lincolnshire England

Another trip report so you can skip this if you are not interested.
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Our annual trip to the British Isles. We arrived at one PM Tuesday via Ryanair. We rented our little red Vauxhall and off we went. Hungry, we went in search of lunch. We went into the little town near the airport and found a pub called The Nags Head. Luther began his Beer studies with a pint of Invictus. He pronounced it golden and light. Then we got on the M11 northward to Lincolnshire.

We went through what is called the Fens. Flat as a pancake and just about as interesting.  Then we got into the Wolds, a hilly and very beautiful area. The entire area is full of old windmills, most without the blades. They are now used as museums, incorporated into houses, made into pubs and many are abandoned. They are brick with small windows up the walls that taper to the top where the blades used to be. They were mills to grind the grain.

There is a crop here that is brilliant yellow and they go for miles… very spectacular. I think it’s canola.
canola_fields
We were again staying in a National Trust Cottage. This time at an estate called Gunby Hall. We arrived at  and, from the parking lot,  made our way to the Orchard Cottage. Of course we got lost, wandered about and finally found it. The way it works is the key is in a lock box and you have the code. You never see anyone. This cottage is very comfortable with wifi, two bedrooms, a bath and a half, nice kitchen and our own private garden. The Gunby estate is open daily, the manor house and the gardens. It closes at 5pm and then everyone is magically gone! And we have the gardens, which are amazing, all to ourselves. It is super private in the cottage as they keep all the visitors away from it.

I took some pictures early the next morning after the rain stopped and the sun shone out.

A wild meadow just in front of our cottage with active bee hives.
blue_meadow

Garden gate.
arched_gateway

Rustic garden path.
blue_meadow_path

Bunnies behind our cottage.
bunnies

Magnificent Cyprus of Lebanon – almost 200 years old.
cyprus_of_lebanon

Formal garden path.
garden_path

We went to a pub for dinner and were very disappointed. It was called the Fleece and maybe it was what I ordered but it was inedible. Sounded good. Peeled scampi with salad and potatoes. I wanted something lighter so I ordered it. Canned cold, watery shrimp, dry salad and boiled potatoes…totally dry potatoes with nothing on them. Butter would have been nice. I even hid my shrimp under the salad because I couldn’t force myself to eat them. Ick.

Next day, Wednesday, we were off to Lincoln. Weather was alternately sunny, rainy with sleet and hail. Wild weather. It was good we were mostly inside. We toured the magnificent cathedral built in the 11th century. Amazing building and how they built it back then boggles the mind.
cathedral

cathedral_crossing

Just one of the many stone details.
stone_head

The Dean’s window
deans_rose_window

Beautiful pulpit
pulpit

One of the most fun things was The Lincoln Imp. A legend tells of it being a creature sent to the cathedral by Satan, only to be turned into stone by an angel. Now it is the symbol of the city, including it’s soccer team. We had a devil of a time finding it :-). It’s very tiny. See this picture. It is not the big head. See if you see the imp.
imp_big

Cropped so you can see him.
the_imp

Magnificent organ
organ

Exterior – storm is coming.
cathedral_storm

Then we toured the castle. It has been there since the 900s. We saw the ACTUAL Magna Carta. Signed in 1215. This was the first Bill of Rights. And also a copy the Charter of the Forest from 1217 which basically re-established rights of access to the Royal Forest to free men which had been eroded by William the Conquerer.

Castle.
Lincoln_castle

Lincoln street.
Lincoln_street

After this we had a nice lunch in the Wig and Mitre pub. Fish and chips with mushy peas was very good here.
pub Then we headed back. This evening I made salmon steaks and sautéed vegetables.

Next day, Thursday, we decided to go on a brewery tour. It was again a nasty rainy day. We think it will be better later in the week. First we visited Skegway, a seaside town. We approached from the north. It is an old town with a big clock tower. Full of take out food shops with Cornish Pasties and Meat pies and sweets. Tons of pinball emporiums, cheap clothing, beach stuff, charity second hand stores. AND I’ve never seen so many motorized wheelchairs and elderly people. Luther says that’s why the shops are full of cheap junk so the old folks think they are getting a deal. OK, I know we are probably considered elderly but we are not yet as elderly as these people were. Just north of this part of town are the enormous caravan parks, mobile homes used as holiday houses parked chock a block with roofs as far as you can see. Also tacky restaurants with karaoke nights and a huge water park and enormous amusement park with the biggest rollercoaster I’ve ever seen. Who sez the British can’t do tacky?

We headed up to visit the Bateman brewery in Wainfleet All Saints. Brewing since 1874. We took the tour which was quite fun and afterward we had a light lunch in the cafe. Luther found their ales quite good! Especially the XXXB.

Luther….studying.
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The bar was inside an old windmill, so it was round.

inside_windmill_bar

For dinner we went to the Blacksmith’s Arms. It was a couple of miles from our Cottage. Nice pub! Front room crowded with locals drinking and chatting. We were seated in one of the dining rooms and Luther had the mixed grill and I had the chicken breast. Both quite nice. Luther’s had everything but the kitchen sink in it. On the way out all the people sitting around the front room, mostly on benches were so curious where we came from.

Finally the day was nicer on Friday. We had reservations to visit the RAF Scampton airbase just north of Lincoln. This was where the Dambusters missions came from. They blew up dams in Germany in the Second World War. There was a movie made about it back in the 50s. They had to come up with all sorts of innovative solutions for the plan to work. They sent 19 missions…only 11 came back. So many men lost. The base is also home to the Red Arrows, the British aerobatic team similar to our Blue Angels. Just our luck, they had flown out the day before we came, to go to Greece to practice in better climes.

Luther sitting in a Red ArrowIMG_1184

The bomb used to blow up the damsIMG_1189

Two Red Arrows and a stunt plane

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Luther sitting at Guy Gibson’s desk. He was the head of the operations. He had a dog, a black Labrador. His name rhymes with Digger. A funny thing happened while we were in the hanger. Digger had gotten hit by a car and they carried him back on a wooden bed. We were standing by this bed and suddenly, out of nowhere, a black Labrador came running around the corner. I think our guides were the most affected. It was like seeing a ghost!IMG_1210

For lunch we went to the Dambusters Pub. I had fish and chips again and Luther had a sandwich. We stopped in Waitrose, a really nice supermarket in England. I bought a few things to bring home. We also bought half of a jerk chicken to cook for dinner which was very good. Another good day.

Saturday dawned beautiful with blue skies and puffy clouds. We were touring National Trust properties today. But first…a mission. I am partnering with a friend, Angela, in a garden venture in Umbertide. I want to grow sweet corn. She has land. I’m paying for the man to prepare the soil. Angela asked me to find horseradish, parsnips, and runner beans for her. So we had to visit a couple of nurseries before we found them. Yay!

Then we headed out to see Tattershall Castle. We could go for free because when you rent a National Trust cottage you get free entry to nearby Trust properties. It was beautiful and imposing and the history was great which I will not go into here.

Church near the castle on the walk there.
old_church_windows

Castlecastle

Church from the castle.church_from_castle

There is a funny story about the fireplaces in the castle. The castle was a ruin when a gentleman bought it and meant to restore it. When he paid for it he went and saw that all the fireplaces had been removed. He said “where are my fireplaces?”. Come to find out someone had taken them all out, crated them up and they were on the dock due to be shipped to America. He paid 2,700 pounds for the castle…and 5,500 pounds to get the fireplaces back! This is one of them.fireplace

Then we started back to our neighborhood, looking for a pub in Croft a sibling of the brewery we visited. We found it but it was closed. So we headed to Burgh le Marsh where we had lunch at the Bell. I tried their Piri Piri chicken which was yum. Spicy!

More studying…
beer

We returned and took the Gunby Hall house tour. It was in the Massingberd family for 250 years and nearly all their belongings are still in the house. The story is that the family fell on hard times, having to sell lands and even personal things like family portraits. Lucky for them the tenants bought them and returned them to the family so they still remain. It is a beautiful house. And the gardens can’t be beat.
formal_garden

This evening we had pasta from the left over salmon with snow peas, onions and garlic…it was good enough.

Sunday was bright but very blustery. We had planned nothing for the day other than a Carvery lunch at the Blacksmith Arms. It was good, if typical but then I knew it would be! For dinner we have left overs, some cold cuts, bread and a pear for a picnic of sorts.

Observation. Lincolnshire is beautiful if a bit old fashioned. Usually, if you do your research you can find gastro-pubs or otherwise good pubs with excellent food. Not so here. Stuck in their ways with heavy, not-so-good food. It didn’t feel like any thought or effort went into it, just going through the motions. We left and drove south and got into Essex where we stopped at The Eight Bells for lunch. Lovely salad and a burger. Nicely prepared with care. So I’ll avoid areas like Lincolnshire from now on.

We enjoyed our trip!

Sunday lunch in Montone

It was one of the 10 most beautiful days in all eternity yesterday. I’ve never seen it so clear. Temperatures in the 70s F. We had already planned to go to Antica Osteria in Montone for lunch so off we went. Montone is the nearby hill town. It is only about 10 minutes from our house. It is a beautiful stone and brick village which is very tidy and well cared for. They are famous for their annual film festival. It was started by one of the Monte Python people who lives in Montone part of the year. All 800 residents work for a week to put on the festival. They have 4 big screens set up around town and each as it’s own little restaurant and bar manned by the citidine. Anyway, I took a few pictures of the town, of course!

One of many gates into town. We chose to enter through this one.
montone_gate

The clock tower above the main square, which is quite small but still manages to have a restaurant and a bar and a Tabacchi. The bells ring every quarter hour.
clock_tower

View from our outside table in the square.
montone_street

My carpaccio starter.
carpaccio

I think this is the first time I’ve had lamb chops since we moved here. These were good but I like them a bit rarer than they were. Served on arugula salad with tomatoes.
chops

We bumped into friends who ate near us and brought Monte along. He looks bored.
monte

On the way out of town. Pretty vista.
gate3

gate2

And here is the town as we drove past it after we had gone down the hill. Perches right on top of two hills.
hill_town

Torino-Turin

Last week we took a short jaunt to Torino which is the capital of the Piedmonte region of Italy. It is also home of the Shroud of Turin. The Shroud is only viewable occasionally and was not while we were there. That was OK as I didn’t really want to see it.

We rented an apartment from VRBO. it was a spacious one bedroom with large modern bath, living room and small kitchen. It also had a nice balcony. Unfortunately we had quite a bit of rain while there so the balcony was not usable. We were, however, in a perfect location right in one of the main piazzas and just next to the Egyptian museum. I did not take any pictures of the city mainly because of the weather. Torino is the headquarters of Fiat so outside the Centro is quite industrial. It is also the birthplace of the Slow Food movement.

Since it was raining a lot we spent a lot of time in the museums. The Eqyptian Museum is said to be the 2nd best in the world. It was pretty spectacular. Some of the many pictures.

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We had a light lunch at Enoteca. Yummy burrata salad.

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We also visited the museum of the Cinema. In the early days of the movies Torino had more than 100 movie studios. The museum was in a spectacular dome shaped building which had kind of a free style elevator. There was a square hole in the floor and in the ceiling. The elevator was all glass and appeared and disappeared through these holes, hanging from the cables through the center of the dome. Here are a couple of pictures. IMG_0055_sm IMG_0054_sm

This is the museum within the dome. IMG_0048_sm

We had two nice dinners while there, one at Del Cambio and the other at Ristorante Solferino. Solferino specialized in Piedmontese specialties. Del Cambio was a one star Michelin restaurant. Excellent everything here.

We went there and back on the train. Intercity from here to Florence and then the fast FrecciaRossa from there. I liked Torino. I did not love it. I don’t know that I would go back.

Pranzo

Last Sunday we were happy to join Alberto the chef at Calagrana, the nearby Agriturismo, for Sunday lunch. Ely is in England tending to her Mom. We missed her. But we enjoyed Alberto’s “old fashioned lunch”. It consisted of a starter of lasagna bolognese (no picture – ate it before I thought!). He said it was his grandmothers recipe. Next we had steak Diane. It brought back memories of my sister making this for my mother. It is traditionally made tableside.

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Then we had a Lemon Padlova which was unfamiliar to me but was excellent.
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Archie is the resident terrier and happy to visit.
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Last week, I was craving banana pudding but realized I could never make it here without Nilla Vanilla wafers. BUT! I remembered a resource I had not tried called My American Market based in Europe to provide Expats with ingredients they are craving. Once I got on their site I couldn’t resist the other items and figured it was worth it to buy them all at once! Sure!
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Here’s my haul. Pam is something I’ve been wanting for ages. You cannot bring aerosol cans on airplanes so there was no way to get it here.
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Sunday Pranzo!

Yesterday we went out for Sunday lunch, an important part of an Italian week. We have been trying a few new restaurants that I read about in a magazine article in a Perugia magazine. Yesterday we tried one called La Forchetta Bistro in the small town of Ponte San Giovanni south of us. There are scores of little towns between Umbertide and Perugia but we always just go speeding past on the E45 heading to somewhere else.

The little town is on the main TrenItalia train line and has an old covered type bridge over the Tiber. It was our first visit to La Forchetta Bistro. We opted to try out the tasting menu at 40€ a person. This included four courses plus dessert. The dining room is bright and sunny with very high ceilings partly divided by a high brick arch. The two people serving us were perfect. Friendly, helpful and the pacing was perfect. Here are some pictures of our amazing food.

Bacala mousse with fried polenta and carmelized tomato coulis. Bacala is a local specialty made from dried salt cod.
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Scallops with fried “hats” and mashed potato which had some spice
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Gnocchi over broccoli purée, with mussels and bits of steamed broccoli. This was the most filling dish.
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Marinated trout served like a Picasso painting with schmears of puréed red cabbage, something orange and dots of green and olive oil. Oh and crunchy fried spinach.
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Finally there were five desserts. We got pears poached in red wine surrounded by chantilly cream and drizzled with chocolate syrup. Divine.

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As you can see all of the presentations were beautiful. It was a surprise in such a small little village and well worth a special trip.